Category Archives: Teaching Resource

Fukushima (2015) on another perspective of politeness

(Image from iconshut.com)

This journal article discusses fresh non-linguistics aspects and perspectives on politeness such as “attentiveness” and “heart”… Read more: fukushima-s-pr-2015-0011.pdf

Abstract:

While politeness has been researched mainly from the perspectives
of face and identity, this conceptual paper explores another understanding of
politeness through the consideration of attentiveness, namely, a demonstrator’s pre-emptive responses to a recipient’s verbal or non-verbal cues or situations surrounding a recipient and a demonstrator, which takes the form of offering.
In this paper, it is suggested that politeness can be construed in relation to the heart; and that behavioral (non-linguistic) politeness, an understudied area in the field, should be taken into account in politeness research. With the development of interpersonal pragmatics, there has been a growing need to investigate interpersonal relationships, and great importance is placed on evaluation in the discursive approach. As attentiveness is an interpersonal notion, which involves evaluation, the consideration of attentiveness meets these demands.
In the present paper, the concept of attentiveness is clarified and it is shown how attentiveness works by presenting the process of demonstration and evaluation of attentiveness.
Keywords: politeness, attentiveness, evaluation, heart

 

Japanese-English “Translation”

Those of you who know Japanese will understand why these errors occur.  Interference is encountered by children, adult bilinguals and multilinguals. It is not just limited to second-language learners (Matras, 2009). The examples in this post are attempts to make communicative use of elements from the repertoire of linguistic resources (however limited) available to the language user. However, interference results in a breakdown of communication—in this case, creating some jokes, and not “enabling” the user to create “bridges” among different subsets of linguistic resources within his/her repertoire.

  1. Flappy goods

  1. I have to praise you like I should.

  1. Benzodiazepizza

 

 

 

 

 

4. Alright, mate, remember to attach a reminder to your oven next time.

5. What thing? What thing?

  1. Where?

  1. Happy ninety-twoth birthday!

  1. Pure Shakespeare
  2. What did the eggs do?

Source of pictures and captions (except 4):

http://jasminejonesy.tumblr.com/post/128638745133/13-insane-japanese-to-english-translation-fails

I have replaced Caption number 4. The verb “attach” has literally been translated from the Japanese verb.  I have also removed two examples of Chinese-English translations from the source because they are not examples of Japanese-English translation errors.

 

Maíz-Arévalo (2015) on jockery mockery on Spanish and English Facebook communities

(Image from patheos.com)

pr-2015-0012

Abstract: Understood as an umbrella term covering different phenomena (e.g.,
banter, teasing, jocular insults, etc.), mock impoliteness has long attracted the
attention of scholars. However, most of this research has concentrated on English
while other languages have been neglected. In addition, previous research
has mostly analyzed face-to-face interaction, generally ignoring computer-mediated
communication. This paper aims to redress this imbalance by analyzing
a particular case of mock impoliteness – i.e., jocular mockery – in two Facebook
communities (Spanish and English). More specifically, and following
Haugh’s (2010) and Haugh and Bousfield’s (2012) three inter-related dimensions,
this paper intends to answer three questions: (i) what triggers jocular
mockery in each corpus? (ii) How is it “framed”? And (iii) how do interlocutors
respond to it? To this end, two balanced datasets were gathered: one in (British)
English and one in (Peninsular) Spanish, consisting of 6,215 and 6,193 words
respectively. Results show that jocular mockery is pervasive in both datasets
and both British and Spanish users resort to it when confronted with bragging.
Likewise, both groups borrow framing strategies from face-to-face communication
but also employ other means afforded by Facebook itself. They also opt
for accepting it good-naturedly as a way to boost group rapport.
Keywords: jocular mockery, computer-mediated communication,

 

Rampton (2015) on what’s going to happen to Applied Linguistics?

(Image from appsgeyser.com)

How is Applied Linguistics as a field affected by social and technological changes?  This short article is divided into two parts. The first contains comments on how higher education is changing in Britain, and the second, some suggestions about how the changes are going to affect applied linguistics in a country like Britain. Read on: applied-linguistics-next-10-years.pdf

—————————————————————————————————–

** For comprehensive lists of Linguistics conferences in 2015 and 2016, please click “Conferences” on the right-hand column of this website.

Chinese language publications on Hakka

(Image from inhabitat.com)

The majority of the Hakka people (客家 )(‘Hakka’ literally meaning ‘guest families’)  are said to live in Guangdong province (China) today, but they can be found in many parts of the world as a result of migration.  The Hakka language, history and traditions are different from those of the Cantonese.

Hakka Studies is a journal article written in Mandarin which introduces recent development and research output of studies on the Hakka people in Singapore. There are only two Chinese language publications on the Hakka language in recent years (see inside):

嚴修鴻,2007,〈新加坡的客家話〉。頁239-302,收錄於黃賢強編《新加坡客家》。桂林:廣西師範大學出版社。

鍾榮富,2011,〈大陸原鄉、新加坡與臺灣的大埔客家話之比較〉。頁637-652,收錄於黃賢強編《族群、歷史與文化:跨域研究東南亞與東亞(上下冊)》。新加坡:新加坡國立大學中文系、八方文化創作室。